INTERVIEW: Landrum Tables

Living in Charleston has opened my eyes to so many skilled craftsman, creatives and hard-working entrepreneurs. One of those individuals includes Capers Cauthen and the team at Landrum Tables, who create some of the finest and most historical tables around.

Several months ago I came across some well built tables at the Farmer’s Market in Marion Square. The look and style of these tables really interested me, and for some reason I sensed that there was more to them than eye appeal and wood. Several months later, I was fortunate to get in touch with Capers and spend some time in the shop, talking to these skilled craftsman and watching how they carefully construct these beautiful pieces. When you first arrive at the shop, you don’t expect much. Weeds and vines grow around the piles of wood stacked up along the outside of the large warehouse style building. But once you enter in through the large dock loading door, you begin to see these piles of old wood transform into amazing handcrafted masterpieces, with attention to every detail. As I began to chat with some of the guys and watch them construct each unique table, I realized that their products are truly one of a kind. One of the most fascinating aspects of Landrum Table’s products, is that each literally owns a piece of history. Weather it’s 100 year old cypress pulled from one of the rivers or 300 year old wood gathered from the remodeling of a historic building here in Charleston, when you buy one of these tables, you also buy a beautiful story that will last forever.

If you want to check out more of their products and details be sure to visit their website. Also, if you live here in Charleston or are planning on visiting, you can see their products in some of the city’s great restaurants, such as FIG and The Fat Hen, or my wife’s favorite flower shop, Charleston Flower Market. 

To keep up with their new work, follow them on Instagram and Facebook.

Brief Q&A below.

Landrum Tables Feature Brothers and CraftLandrum Tables Feature Brothers and CraftQ&A with Capers Cauthen, Designer and Founder of Landrum Tables

Kirk: How did the name “Landrum Tables” originate?

Capers: Landrum is my middle name.

Kirk: I appreciate the fact that you saw value in wood that was being destroyed and thrown away and the passion you have to recreate it into something new for others to enjoy. Wood can build so many things, how did you decide to craft tables?

Capers: I’ve been an antique dealer since the age of 17 and always liked Hepplewhite furniture. It’s the best way to build and preserve the natural patina.

Kirk: I really like the simplistic, clean look of each table. What inspired this design.

Capers: The cross between fine lines and rough wood.

Kirk: I know that you use all kinds of wood and of all ages, so what kind of wood do you like working with the most and which one would your prefer for your own table.

Capers: Cypress is probably the best wood to work with and definitely makes a great table.

Kirk: You guys hand craft some amazing tables, is there any other product or piece you’re planning on adding to your inventory in 2014 or in the near future?

Capers: We actually have already begun crafting and selling custom fly rod and gun stands.

Kirk: What is the oldest and/or most unique table you’ve built?

Capers: The most historical table includes 1700’s wood from the dependency behind the Rectors house on St. Michael’s alley, and the oldest table was reclaimed cypress from the river.

Kirk: What is your favorite aspect of working for Landrum Tables?

Capers: The best part about what I do is getting to meet so many people and build their table specifically for them.

(From left to right: Rob, Jay, Jayson, Capers, Eric)Landrum Tables Feature Brothers and CraftLandrum Tables Feature Brothers and CraftLandrum Tables Feature Brothers and CraftLandrum Tables Feature Brothers and CraftBig thanks to Capers for letting us feature their amazing work. Please support these guys and come check out their tables and other products next time you’re in town.

Cheers,

Kirk

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